Ultramundane (1983)

Photo: Gary Stevens

An inversion of the world. The performers were placed in a landscape which had been sliced up and jumbled in its transposition to the stage. They may be physically together yet dramatically separate, for they belonged to different parts of the landscape, and their sculptural choreography explored the possibilities of simultaneous, interleaved action. Sometimes parts of the landscape were rotated or inverted in respect to one another, so that the performers may be speaking and acting quite normally, but upside down. Occasionally one will make the disorienting move from one place to another, transforming, arriving out of the blue. For an entry to a house, a man at a table, upside down and ten feet off the ground, descended and rotated slowly through the air, both landing gently on the stage.

Press Reviews
"They have developed a remarkable, over-the-top, wooden-top style of performing which is extremely funny in its anti-RADA rigidity. Don't miss this highly original group."
Sarah Kent, Time Out

"Inane… gibberish."
Nicholas de Jongh, The Guardian

Bibliography

Review: Ultramundane
10 Nov 1983
Published in The Guardian

Review: Ultramundane
16 Nov 1983
Published in Time Out London

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